Bathysphere

  • Play:
     
  • Title: Bathysphere
  • Author: Arch Oboler
  • Director: Robert Arnold
  • Date Posted: September 29, 2014
  • Length: 29:05 minutes (26.67 MB)
  • Format: MP3 Mono 44kHz 128Kbps (CBR)

Bathysphere
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Two men, a scientist and a dictator, are sealed in a metal sphere and plunged into the ocean, hoping to break a record. What they discover in the depths will lead them into the depths of their own fears, hopes, and spirits. A timeless political thriller from radio playwright Arch Oboler, originally produced on November 18, 1939.






Cast and Crew

Role   Name
The Leader ..................... Greg Boller
The Scientist ..................... Kinon Keplinger
The Captain ..................... Robert Arnold
The Captain ..................... Barnypok RwaDGXGhsycHjT
Sound Effects ..................... Aaron Jones
Sound Effects ..................... Amy Salerno Hale
Assistant Director ..................... Amy Salerno Hale
Producer ..................... Robert Arnold
Producer ..................... Barnypok RwaDGXGhsycHjT
Director ..................... Robert Arnold
Director ..................... Barnypok RwaDGXGhsycHjT
Artist ..................... Natalie Jackson


Special Thanks to:



Notes

Produced for The Sonic Society's annual "Summerstock Playhouse," in which contemporary audio theater producers recreate classic Old Time Radio shows, Bathysphere gave us a chance to engage with one of my favorite radio playwrights. Though he may no longer be a household name, Arch Oboler is one of the quintessential radio dramatists of the 20th century, and many of his works -- scary, dramatic, absurd, darkly funny -- maintain a surprising relevance today.

Certainly this is the case with Bathysphere, which prompted several great conversations during rehearsal about its themes, meaning, and ramifications. I will remember those conversations fondly, along with the dream-team cast and crew, and the fact that we gradually dimmed the lights as the recording went on to give the performers a growing feeling of immersion and claustrophobia.

Oboler's vision of power and authority is bleak. But embedded in this dark tale is a ray of hope. As the Leader himself admits, he and his kind will always have one insurmountable weakness: "You could have gone to the people."

--Robert Arnold



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